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FOMC Hikes Interest Rates; Will Mortgage Rates Follow?

Fed Close upThe Federal Open Market Committee voted Wednesday to raise interest rates for the second time this year to 1-1.25 percent, a move that was widely expected amongst economists and industry professionals and described as “prudent” by FOMC Board of Governors Chair Janet Yellen.

Back in March, they voted to increase the rate a modest quarter of a point to maintain the Fed’s goal of maximum employment and market stability.

The FOMC is of the opinion that waiting too long to scale back accommodations could potentially cause a rapid increase in rates, which could disrupt the market and send the economy into another recession. June’s rate increase reflects this continued belief, and follows Janet Yellen’s comments from March that, “we continue to expect that the ongoing strength of the economy will warrant gradual increases in the federal funds rate to achieve and maintain our objectives.”

It is currently unclear how the hike in interest rates will affect mortgage rates. On Tuesday, Mark Fleming, Chief Economist at First American, stated he didn’t foresee mortgage interest climbing much—if at all—because rates are more closely tied to a 10-year Treasury bond, something that is not really affected by short term rate hikes made by the Fed.

Conversely, Brad Walker, CEO of Income&, thinks it will have a short term effect on mortgage rates.

“We expect to see an increase in mortgage rates in the short term, just as we did with the two previous increases. However, current housing demand and its effect on housing prices can diminish or exacerbate this rise in mortgage rates.”

What is clear, according to Curt Long, Chief Economist of the National Association of Federally-Insured Credit Unions (NAFCU), is that the Fed’s choice to increase rates is a good sign for the future.

“The actions taken by the Fed reflect confidence in the labor market and a perception that global risks have declined in the first six months of the year,” he said. “Nevertheless, the outlook for the second half is uncertain. Inflation has slowed recently and the debt ceiling debate poses political risk. But with the Fed stating its intentions to start reducing the size of the balance sheet this year, it is offering a clear vote of confidence for the economy.”

In Wednesday’s press conference, and in the previously released addendum to the Policy Normalization Principles and Plans, Yellen confirmed that “changing the target range for the federal funds rate is its primary means of adjusting the stance of monetary policy.” As such, NAFCU is reporting that one more quarter-point rate hike is due in 2017, three in 2018, and three to four in 2019, although the FOMC made it very clear that they are constantly amending their stance as the economy changes, so nothing is set in stone.

The FOMC is scheduled to meet again July 25-26. 

About Author: Joey Pizzolato

Joey Pizzolato is the Online Editor of DS News and MReport. He is a graduate of Spalding University, where he holds a holds an MFA in Writing as well as DePaul University, where he received a B.A. in English. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in a variety of print and online journals and magazines. To contact Pizzolato, email joseph.pizzolato@thefivestar.com.
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