Home >> Daily Dose >> Mortgage Applications See Another Drop as Interest Rates Rise
Print This Post Print This Post

Mortgage Applications See Another Drop as Interest Rates Rise

decreasing-twoMortgage application volumes came down for a second straight reading last week as rising interest rates sent refinance demand spiraling down.

The Mortgage Bankers Association's (MBA) weekly measure of mortgage application numbers fell a seasonally adjusted 13.2 percent for the week ending February 13, the group reported Wednesday.

Following a 10 percent drop in early February, refinance applications fell another 16 percent last week, reflecting a pause among consumers as mortgage rates moved up to an average 3.93 percent (for a 30-year fixed-rate loan) on news of continuing job growth.

"Mortgage rates increased to their highest level since the beginning of the year last week, and application volume dropped sharply as a result, particularly for refinances," said MBA Chief Economist Mike Fratantoni. "Refinance volume fell particularly for larger loans, as evidenced by the decline of almost $25,000 in the average loan size for a refinance loan."

The most recent decline brought the refinance share of mortgage activity down to 66 percent of total applications, a decrease of 3 percentage points from the week prior.

MBA's seasonally adjusted gauge of home purchase applications also fell, declining 7 percent week-on-week. Unadjusted, purchase loan volumes fell 2percent from early February but were up 1 percent compared to the same week last year.

The declines came just weeks after the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) cut down its annual mortgage insurance premium to 0.85 percent, a move that was hoped to spur interest from first-time and cash-strapped homebuyers.

While the FHA reduction may not have helped lift application activity last week, it did get some attention: According to MBA, the FHA share of total applications increased to 15.2 percent, a gain of more than 1 percentage point from the previous week.

In a recent study, researchers at the Urban Institute estimated that 2.4 million current FHA borrowers could benefit financially from refinancing now that premiums are lower. At the same time, the group noted that savings—and demand—could change, depending on where mortgage rates headed.

About Author: Tory Barringer

Tory Barringer began his journalism career in early 2011, working as a writer for the University of Texas at Arlington's student newspaper before joining the DS News team in 2012. In addition to contributing to DSNews.com, he is also the online editor for DS News' sister publication, MReport, which focuses on mortgage banking news.
x

Check Also

Seniors Struggling to Keep up With Housing Costs

  A new survey from Property Shark states that 30% of respondents over the age ...

GET THE NEWS YOU NEED, WHEN YOU NEED IT.

With daily content from MReport, you’ll never miss another important headline in originations, lending, or servicing. Subscribe to MDaily to begin receiving a complimentary daily email containing the top mortgage news and market information.