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House and Senate Republicans Release Joint Tax Legislation

On Friday, Republicans unveiled details of the final version of their tax cut bill, clearing the way for a floor vote that is expected to happen next week.

To view the full agreement, click here.

Here are the details of the final tax agreement, according to highlights from the conference committee reported by CBS News:

  • Preserves the mortgage interest deduction for all homeowners with existing mortgages, and for homeowners with new mortgages, the home mortgage interest deduction will be available up to $750,000.
  • The GOP claims the bill will mean a $2,059 tax cut for a family of four earning the median family income of $73,000.
  • Eliminates penalty under the Affordable Care Act for failing to have health insurance.
  • Lowers corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent (higher than the original 20 percent in the House and Senate bills).
  • Reduces top effective marginal tax rate for S corporations to a top rate of 29.6 percent, allowing for a 20 percent tax deduction that applies to the first $315,000 of joint income earned by all S-corporations.
  • Eliminates corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT); increases the exemption amount from the AMT for individuals.
  • Keeps seven individual tax brackets, although those brackets would change.
  • Continues to exempt the value of tuition waivers from taxes (the GOP had considered counting tuition waivers as income, and thus, taxable).
  • Increases the refundable portion of the child tax credit to $1,400, thanks to Rubio's insistence. The overall child tax credit will increase from $1,000 to $2,000.
  • Roughly doubles the standard deduction, from $6,350 to $12,000 for individuals, and from $12,700 to $24,000 for married couples filing jointly
  • Preserves the child adoption tax credit.
  • Allows filers to write off the cost of state and local taxes, but only up to $10,000. Filers must choose from among sales, income and property taxes for the deduction, instead of being able to deduct all local taxes.
  • Preserves the charitable deduction as it is.

According to CNN, the language was finalized late Thursday night—as the GOP leaders had to make 100 percent sure they had the votes as no other revisions are allowed.

About Author: Nicole Casperson

Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech's College of Media and Communications. To contact Casperson, e-mail: nicole.casperson@thefivestar.com.

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